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Thursday 14 December, 2017 | RSS Feed

About Mac notebook batteries

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About Mac notebook batteries Learn how to optimize the life of the battery in your Mac notebook, fix battery issues, and get service. Understanding batteries in Mac notebooks Terms and definitions The battery status menu Optimizing battery life Adjusting display and keyboard brightness Graphics performance and its impact on battery life Energy Saver System Preferences Disabling features and technologies that use power Troubleshooting batteries Built-in diagnostic tools My battery runtime is low My battery isn't charging My battery won't charge to 100% My battery isn't recognized The low battery warning doesn't display Servicing the battery in your Mac notebook Battery warranty information Understanding batteries in Mac notebooks MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro computers come with lithium polymer batteries to provide maximum battery life in a compact space. To understand battery technology and battery life, it's good to know common battery terminology: Cycle count: Batteries are expected to function for a certain number of cycles. This number represents the sum of total and partial discharge cycles throughout the life of the battery. You can see the cycle count limit for your computer by reviewing Determining battery cycle count for Mac notebooks. Full charge capacity: Measured in mAH (milliampere-hours), this refers to the amount of power the battery is capable of containing, less the energy required to shut down the device. This number lowers as the battery becomes depleted with usage and age. Remaining charge capacity: This number represents the current amount of power left in the battery as measured in mAh (milliampere-hours). Using the computer when not connected to AC power will cause this number to lower as power is depleted from the battery. Consumed / depleted: Consumable parts are those that deplete over time as their internal components are used. Batteries, due to their chemical components, are considered consumables, and over time they lose their ability to hold a charge. If the cycle count on a battery exceeds its expected limit, the battery is considered consumed. Defective: Batteries are considered defective when they stop working due to a defect in materials or workmanship, or due to a manufacturing defect. Defective batteries are covered under Apple's one-year limited warranty and extended-service contracts. Load: The amount of activity being performed by a task or tasks. Certain power-intensive processes place a heavier load on the battery and result in a much-reduced runtime per charge. Setting up your Mac for the first time When you set up your Mac for the first time, some activities





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